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Rebuild Florida Infrastructure Repair Program

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Public Notice - Fourteen-Day Public Comment Period

The City of Fort Lauderdale is considering submitting grant applications for the Rebuild Florida Infrastructure Repair Program administered by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity to obtain funding for the following City Projects;

  1. South East Isles Seawall Replacements

    Project Cost Estimate:  $9,000,000

    This project is for approximately 2,500 linear feet (LF) of seawalls located in the South East Isles neighborhood of Fort Lauderdale and that need replacement.  These seawalls were constructed over 50 years ago and have become structurally deficient and functionally obsolete, as their top elevation is below Spring High Tide elevation, causing tidal flooding and over-topping 5-10 times per year. 

    During Hurricane Irma, these seawalls were further deteriorated by the wave action and massive neighborhood flooding occurred when the storm surge overtopped them by several feet. 

    The City is requesting $9,000,000 in funding from the Rebuild Florida Infrastructure Repair Program for this project.  These grant funds would be used to perform a full replacement of these seawalls, with deep sheet pile structure and top of wall elevation of 5.00’ NAVD.  The sheet pile construction and higher top elevation will ensure that new seawalls will protect the South East neighborhood against future storm surges and sea-level rise for at least 50 years and beyond.

    Please forward all comments to Francisco Rios, P.E., at frios@fortlauderdale.gov.

  2. Coral Ridge B-4 Sewer Basin Rehabilitation

Project Cost Estimate:  $4,200,000

This project is for the Coral Ridge B-4 Sewer Basin that was identified as having excessive inflow and infiltration flows which contributes to additional sewage to George T. Lohmeyer Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant (GTL). 

There are three major components of wastewater flow in a sanitary sewer system, base flow, groundwater infiltration, and rainfall derived inflow and infiltration, more commonly referred to as inflow.  Some of the existing sewer systems in the City of Fort Lauderdale have clay pipes, cast iron pipes and PVC plastic pipes.  Many of the City's systems are still using old pipes, leaving them susceptible to damage. 

Hurricanes can put sewer systems at risk due to power loss and flooding.  When power outages affect lift stations that pump sewage from low to higher elevations for treatment, the City has limited ability to process and dispose of wastewater properly.  Widespread flooding causes sewer systems to back up when rainwater infiltrates pipes faster than wastewater plants can process it. 

Sewer systems in the City are built to keep stormwater and wastewater separate, but leaky infrastructure can allow floodwater into waste pipes, overwhelming the system.  Over 28 million gallons of wastewater spilled across Florida in the wake of Hurricane Irma.  During Hurricane Irma, inflow and infiltration added a significant volume of gallons of stormwater per person per day into the sewers, instead of the average daily gallons per person of water use that is typical during dry weather. 

The City is requesting $4,200,000 in funding from the Rebuild Florida Infrastructure Repair Program for this project.  These grant funds will be used for point repairs, rehabilitation of mainline sewers in Basin B-4 and lining of gravity sewers, manholes and sewer laterals.

Please forward all comments to Diana Carillo, P.E. at dcarrillo@fortlauderdale.gov.